Tuesday, September 4, 2012

6 questions journalists should be able to answer before pitching a story

  • What piques your curiosity about the story?
  • What’s new about the story, and why do you want to tell it now?
  • Why will the reader or viewer care about the story?
  • How can we tell this story digitally? (or visually)
  • What questions will you need to ask to get this story, and what sources will you need to consult?
  • How much time will you need to produce the story, and how much space/time do you think the story deserves?
Sunday, July 22, 2012
If you don’t want to propagate more mass murders, don’t start the story with sirens blaring. Don’t have photographs of the killer. Don’t make this 24-7 coverage. Do everything you can to not make the body-count the lead story, not to make the killer some kind of anti-hero. DO localize the story to the affected community and make it as boring as possible in every other market. Because every time we have intense saturation coverage of a mass murder, we expect to see one or two more within a week.

How to Cover a Mass Murder (via modernprimate)

I meant to reblog this to my personal account, but I’ll let it remain here. Thoughts are with Aurora.

(via ilovecharts)

Sunday, June 3, 2012
We decided to credit editors because they live and breath the stories they work on, and I felt that some kind of recognition was due. It’s really as simple as that. The kind of work they do varies widely from story to story, it’s very difficult to generalize. What makes our editors so good is they know how to do a light line editing, when that’s all that’s required, and they know how to wrestle something to the ground, when that’s what’s required. Usually, it’s somewhere in between.

Hugo Lindgren, Editor, New York Times Magazine. Reddit. I’m Hugo Lindgren, editor of the New York Times magazine.

Hugo Lindgren spent time on Reddit’s IAmA board yesterday to answer questions about his career, magazines and journalism. Here, he’s talking about giving editors byline credits in the magazine.

His thoughts are great on other topics too, especially for those looking to get into magazines.

(via futurejournalismproject)

Thursday, May 10, 2012
jtotheizzoe:

Handy Guide to Reading Science News!
Someone very smart once said (paraphrasing here): “Your head should be open to new ideas, but not so open that your brains fall out.”
Keep these tips in mind when you read science news, and beware alarmism. You don’t have to stop feeling amazed and awed to be a little cautious and skeptical. I’ll be posting more tips like this in the future.
(via Double X Science)

jtotheizzoe:

Handy Guide to Reading Science News!

Someone very smart once said (paraphrasing here): “Your head should be open to new ideas, but not so open that your brains fall out.”

Keep these tips in mind when you read science news, and beware alarmism. You don’t have to stop feeling amazed and awed to be a little cautious and skeptical. I’ll be posting more tips like this in the future.

(via Double X Science)

Saturday, April 14, 2012

thefullbradlee:

“Zooey Deschanel filed for divorce from husband Death Cab, throwing him over for Cutie frontman Ben Gibbard.”

OK, even the briefest search on The Google could have prevented this. And sadly it got posted on at least ABC News and Yahoo on April 10, 2012. But I do like the concept birthed by the gaffe. If a band breaks up — split the name: Red Hot and Chili Peppers, Black and Keys, um Wil and Co? Source: Shared files.

Saturday, April 7, 2012 Wednesday, April 4, 2012
millionsmillions:

“For most of those in the opinion-writing business, the news hook is an ugly necessity. In my five years as a political speechwriter, I wrote and placed dozens of op-ed pieces for my bosses — and each time, the hardest task was arranging a marriage between the piece’s policy agenda and a news hook, the paragraph or two of timeliness that made the policy medicine easier to swallow and was a requirement for publication anywhere. Each time, a little bow of deference to the news cycle, no matter how halfhearted — it could be a good monthly jobs report or a bad one, an embarrassing slip of the tongue from the other party, or something as predictable as Tax Day — helped answer the mandatory question: not ‘why this?’ but ‘why this, now?’”
- The Berenstain Bears and the Tyranny of Timeliness by Rob Goodman

millionsmillions:

“For most of those in the opinion-writing business, the news hook is an ugly necessity. In my five years as a political speechwriter, I wrote and placed dozens of op-ed pieces for my bosses — and each time, the hardest task was arranging a marriage between the piece’s policy agenda and a news hook, the paragraph or two of timeliness that made the policy medicine easier to swallow and was a requirement for publication anywhere. Each time, a little bow of deference to the news cycle, no matter how halfhearted — it could be a good monthly jobs report or a bad one, an embarrassing slip of the tongue from the other party, or something as predictable as Tax Day — helped answer the mandatory question: not ‘why this?’ but ‘why this, now?’”

- The Berenstain Bears and the Tyranny of Timeliness by Rob Goodman